[Game: Hades, Supergiant Games, 2020]
Ode on a Grecian Burn:

How Hades Shores Up Minor Weaknesses of Supergiant Games’ Earlier Releases

 

Introduction:

Each of the first three titles created by Supergiant Games excels in some obvious way over their other offerings. Pyre contains their most imaginative fantasy world, and some of their best original characters. Transistor has the studio’s most innovative and unique core gameplay system, as well as their best soundtrack. And Bastion’s stellar implementation of dynamic narration and avoidance of the later games’ reliance on text boxes and paragraph-long info dumps make it so it’s still unmatched in their repertoire in terms of the successful integration of most story material into the actual moment-to-moment gameplay.

With that list in mind, it’s not immediately clear what Hades offers to make me say the following: it’s Supergiant’s best creation overall. That lack of clarity comes from the fact that it’s not any one single exceptional strength of the game that far outstrips the other titles—but instead the way that Hades echoes their strengths while addressing noteworthy weaknesses of each of their earlier games. Thus, in addition to sharing the high level of quality in art, music, gameplay, polish, and so on possessed by all of the team’s work, it is also the case that, in the few ways in which their earlier games stumbled, Hades dashes ahead.

Continue reading

[Game: Hades, Supergiant Games, 2020]
Ode on a Grecian Burn:

How Hades Shores Up Minor Weaknesses of Supergiant Games’ Earlier Releases

was last modified: October 19th, 2023 by Daniel Podgorski